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‘LIFE’ Monument, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York City ‘LIFE’ Monument, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York City ‘LIFE’ Monument, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York City ‘LIFE’ Monument, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York City ‘LIFE’ Monument, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York City

Public Art

in Public Art

‘LIFE’ Monument, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York City

“Life”Monument by Antonio Pio Saracino is a public art project commissioned by an anonymous donor for the historic entrance to the New York-Presbyterian Hospital on 68th street in Upper East Side, Manhattan.

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New York-Presbyterian is one of the top-ranked clinical and medical research centers in the United States. Their motto, “Amazing things are happening here,” reflects each life they have saved and the progress that their school of research has achieved. “Life” project consists of two sculptures, each composed of a series of mirror polished, stainless steel rings with different heights and radiuses assembled on top of each other and shifted from their vertical axis to create two dynamic, iconic figures. Saracino states: “The ‘Life’ sculptures are visually unstable  at the same time that they maintain an internal stability. Life is fragile and vulnerable yet life is strong and resilient.  Life is about finding that unique balance between inner and outer forces that unfold during our existence.” The two cylindrical towers stand 9 feet and 18 feet tall. The visual unbalance, contrasted against the structural stability of the sculptures, poses viewers to reflect on the balance that one must strive to achieve in nearly all aspects of life, as well as the fine line between strength and fragility. They remind us that life is a treasure, something to be preserved and cherished. At nighttime, the sculptures are illuminated from within and expose their inner core announcing the vortex stack of cylinders in a different light and perspective that is mostly invisible during the daylight. The project was called “Life” to remind us of the delicate nature of being, but at the same time, to recall the strength we find within ourselves.  This is the tightrope that we must travel along everyday. The project will be completed by the end of Spring 2016.